The evolution of female sexuality

@article{RodrguezGirons2001TheEO,
  title={The evolution of female sexuality},
  author={Miguel Angel Rodr{\'i}guez-Giron{\'e}s and Magnus Enquist},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2001},
  volume={61},
  pages={695-704}
}
Females in monogamous species tend to be more sexually active than females in species with other mating systems. In this paper we consider the possibility that female sexuality has evolved because more sexually active females have received more male assistance. We develop a model in which there is no direct cue available to males indicating whether the female is fertile. Instead males might respond to female behaviour as an indirect cue. The latter could favour increased female sexuality if… 

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