The evolution of eusociality in molerats (Bathyergidae): a question of risks, numbers, and costs

@article{Lovegrove2004TheEO,
  title={The evolution of eusociality in molerats (Bathyergidae): a question of risks, numbers, and costs},
  author={Barry Gordon Lovegrove},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={37-45}
}
  • B. Lovegrove
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryThis paper addresses risk and energetic considerations fundamentaly causative in the evolution of eusociality in the bathyergid molerats. Three simple mathematical models are presented which predict the probability of successful outbreeding in terms of dispersal risks and the energetic costs of foraging. The predictions of the models are compared with data from the literature, which mostly provide excellent empirical and theoretical support.Inter-habitat dispersal risks are influenced… Expand

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