The evolution of cellulose digestion in insects

@article{Martin1991TheEO,
  title={The evolution of cellulose digestion in insects},
  author={MICHAEL M. Martin},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B},
  year={1991},
  volume={333},
  pages={281-288}
}
  • MICHAEL M. Martin
  • Published 1991
  • Biology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B
Despite the abundance and diversity of species that include living or dead plant tissue in their diets, the ability to digest cellulose is rare in insects and is restricted to a small number of orders and families. In this paper it is argued that cellulolytic capacity is uncommon in insects simply because it is a trait that is rarely advantageous to possess. Although there is a growing body of evidence for the occurrence of symbiont-independent cellulose digestion in cockroaches and in higher… Expand
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Abstract 1. 1. Enzymes involved in cellulose degradation purified from the forest fungus-growing termite Macrotermes mulleri and from the mycotetes of its symbiotic fungus Termitomyces sp. have beenExpand
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