The evolution of body size, Cope's rule and the origin of amniotes.

@article{Laurin2004TheEO,
  title={The evolution of body size, Cope's rule and the origin of amniotes.},
  author={Michel Laurin},
  journal={Systematic biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={53 4},
  pages={
          594-622
        }
}
  • M. Laurin
  • Published 1 August 2004
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Systematic biology
The evolution of body size in tetrapods is assessed using a database that includes 107 early stegocephalian species ranging in time from the Frasnian (Upper Devonian) to the Tatarian (Upper Permian). All analyses use methods that incorporate phylogenetic information (topology and branch lengths). In all tests, the impact of alternative topologies and branch lengths are assessed. Previous reports that raised doubts about the accuracy of squared-change parsimony assessment of ancestral character… 
Body size evolution in Mesozoic birds: little evidence for Cope’s rule
TLDR
It is demonstrated that Cope’s rule is not supported in Mesozoic birds by the available data, and body size evolution currently provides no insights into avian survivorship through the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction.
Body Size Reductions in Nonmammalian Eutheriodont Therapsids (Synapsida) during the End-Permian Mass Extinction
TLDR
Evaluating temporal and phylogenetic distributions of body size in Permo-Triassic therocephalian and cynodont therapsids using a museum collections-based approach and time series model fitting on a regional stratigraphic sequence from the Karoo Basin, South Africa supports significant size reductions in the immediate aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction.
Testing for Depéret's Rule (Body Size Increase) in Mammals using Combined Extinct and Extant Data
TLDR
A method to combine information from present-day species with fossil data in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework is presented, and it is shown that complementary data from extant and extinct species can greatly improve inference of macroevolutionary processes.
Microanatomy of the radius and lifestyle in amniotes (Vertebrata, Tetrapoda)
TLDR
The discriminant function based on taxa of known lifestyle is used to infer the lifestyle of three extinct amniotes: the early nothosaur Pachypleurosaurus, therapsid Lystrosaurus and the synapsid Ophiacodon and these predictions are congruent with classical palaeoecological interpretations.
A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of coelacanth fishes (Sarcopterygii, Actinistia) with comments on the composition of the Mawsoniidae and Latimeriidae: evaluating old and new methodological challenges and constraints
TLDR
An updated phylogenetic analysis based on a new consensual data matrix is presented, merging most of the emendations proposed over the past two decades, and including a completely reviewed character scoring for some genera.
The utility of cranial ontogeny for phylogenetic inference: a case study in crocodylians using geometric morphometrics
TLDR
This work used three‐dimensional geometric morphometric methods to characterize the cranial morphology of 10 extant crocodylian species and construct allometric trajectories that model the post‐natal ontogenetic shape changes, demonstrating a lack of significant phylogenetic signal, indicating that ontogenetics shape changes contain little phylogenetic information.
Evolution of skull shape in the family Salamandridae (Amphibia: Caudata)
TLDR
A comparative morphometric analysis of 56 species of salamandrid salamanders, representing 19 out of 21 extant genera, found that allometry explains a relatively small amount of shape variation across taxa, and that a reduction of the frontosquamosal arch occurs independently in three lineages of the subfamily Pleurodelinae.
Recent progress in paleontological methods for dating the Tree of Life
  • M. Laurin
  • Environmental Science
    Front. Gene.
  • 2012
TLDR
Progress has been made in compiling databases and supertrees incorporating paleontological data, in computing confidence intervals on the true stratigraphic range of taxa, and in using birth-and-death processes to assess the probability distribution of the time of origin of specified taxa.
Cope's rule in cryptodiran turtles: do the body sizes of extant species reflect a trend of phyletic size increase?
  • D. Moen
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Journal of evolutionary biology
  • 2006
TLDR
Whether the phylogenetic distribution of body sizes in extant cryptodiran turtles is consistent with Cope's rule is examined, which finds no evidence for phyletic size increase, in contrast to the paleontological data that support the rule in a number of extinct vertebrates.
Use of Paleontological and Phylogenetic Data in Comparative and Paleobiological Analyses: A Few Recent Developments
TLDR
This review presents a few methods of general interest to comparative biologists, such as phylogenetic independent contrasts (PIC) and variance partition with phylogenetic eigenvector regression and squared-change parsimony and PIC.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 231 REFERENCES
Body-size evolution in Cretaceous molluscs and the status of Cope's rule
TLDR
A comprehensive census of body-size changes in a large fauna of Cretaceous bivalve and gastropod genera shows that the undisputed ecological importance of body size does not translate into a preferred macroevolutionary pattern.
The phylogenetic trunk: maximal inclusion of taxa with missing data in an analysis of the lepospondyli (Vertebrata, Tetrapoda).
TLDR
The phylogenetic trunk approach is proposed to allow optimization of taxonomic inclusion and tree stability and finds a single most-parsimonious tree, or trunk, after the removal of one taxon identified as being problematic.
Early tetrapod relationships revisited
TLDR
A deep split of early tetrapods between lissamphibian‐ and amniote‐related taxa is detected and is indicated by the results of the original parsimony run ‐ as well as those retrieved from several other treatments of the data set.
Causality and Cope's rule; evidence from the planktonic foraminifera
TLDR
This observation suggests that smaller bodied species, rather than surviving stressful times with static morphologies, may evolve their way through times of crisis and go on to found lineages which, by virtue of their initial small size, are stochastically likely to increase in mean size during subsequent diversification.
Building large trees by combining phylogenetic information: a complete phylogeny of the extant Carnivora (Mammalia)
TLDR
A complete phylogeny for all 271 extant species of the Garnivora is derived, providing a ‘consensus’ estimate of carnivore phylogeny and showing that some lineages within the Mustelinae and Canidae contain significantly more species than expected for their age, illustrating the tree's utility for studies of macroevolution.
ORIGIN AND EARLY EVOLUTION OF THE AMNIOTE OCCIPUT
TLDR
A phylogenetic study of major groups of Paleozoic tetrapods based on the occiput and closely associated elements of the skull roof finds that the Anthracosauria and Baphetidae are progressively more distant clades or sister taxa.
A reevaluation of early amniote phylogeny
TLDR
It is indicated that three major clades of amniotes extend from the present to the Palaeozoic, and these three clades are the Synapsida (including Mammalia), Parareptilia (including Testudines), and Eureptili (including Sauria).
Osteolepiforms and the ancestry of tetrapods
TLDR
The supposedly discredited idea of osteolepiforms as tetrapod ancestors is supported by the first detailed analysis of the lower part of the Tetrapodomorpha, based on 99 characters scored for 29 taxa.
EARLY EVOLUTION OF REPTILES
TLDR
The fossil record of early amniotes is complete enough to establish their relationships to the major groups living today and provides an opportunity to consider the evolutionary processes associated with a period of major radiation.
CHAPTER 2 – A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON TETRAPOD PHYLOGENY
...
...