The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in spiders and insects

@article{Huber2007TheEO,
  title={The evolution of asymmetric genitalia in spiders and insects},
  author={Bernhard A. Huber and Bradley J. Sinclair and M Schmitt},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2007},
  volume={82}
}
Asymmetries are a pervading phenomenon in otherwise bilaterally symmetric organisms and recent studies have highlighted their potential impact on our understanding of fundamental evolutionary processes like the evolution of development and the selection for morphological novelties caused by behavioural changes. One character system that is particularly promising in this respect is animal genitalia because (1) asymmetries in genitalia have evolved many times convergently, and (2) the taxonomic… 
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