The evolution of South American endemic canids: a history of rapid diversification and morphological parallelism

@article{Perini2010TheEO,
  title={The evolution of South American endemic canids: a history of rapid diversification and morphological parallelism},
  author={Fernando Araujo Perini and Claudia A. M. Russo and Carlos G. Schrago},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={23}
}
The origin of endemic South American canid fauna has been traditionally linked with the rise of the Isthmus of Panama, suggesting that diversification of the dog fauna on this continent occurred very rapidly. Nevertheless, despite its obvious biogeographic appeal, the tempo of Canid evolution in South America has never been studied thoroughly. This issue can be suitably tackled with the inference of a molecular timescale. In this study, using a relaxed molecular clock method, we estimated that… Expand

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