The evolution and phylogenetic placement of invasive Australian Acacia species

@article{Miller2011TheEA,
  title={The evolution and phylogenetic placement of invasive Australian Acacia species},
  author={Joseph T. Miller and Daniel J. Murphy and Gillian K. Brown and David M. Richardson and Carlos E. Gonz{\'a}lez‐Orozco},
  journal={Diversity and Distributions},
  year={2011},
  volume={17}
}
Aim  Acacia is the largest genus of plants in Australia with over 1000 species. A subset of these species is invasive in many parts of the world including Africa, the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific region. We investigate the phylogenetic relationships of the invasive species in relation to the genus as a whole. This will provide a framework for studying the evolution of traits that make Acacia species such successful invaders and could assist in screening other species… 

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