The ethics of research on great apes

@article{Gagneux2005TheEO,
  title={The ethics of research on great apes},
  author={Pascal Gagneux and James J. Moore and Ajit Varki},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={437},
  pages={27-29}
}
In the wake of the chimpanzee genome publication, Pascal Gagneux, James J. Moore and Ajit Varki consider the ethical and scientific challenges for scientists who work on captive great apes.The chimpanzee genomeThe cover photo by Kevin Langergraber shows the adult female chimpanzee ‘Jolie’ in Kibale National Park, Uganda. This was taken on 16 August 2004, a few weeks before Jolie gave birth to her first infant. This week marks a landmark in the study of our closest living relative: the… 

Comparing the human and chimpanzee genomes: Searching for needles in a haystack

The chimpanzee genome sequence is a long-awaited milestone, providing opportunities to explore primate evolution and genetic contributions to human physiology and disease, and both genome-wide analyses and candidate gene studies should be considered complementary.

Comparing the human and chimpanzee genomes: searching for needles in a haystack.

The chimpanzee genome sequence is a long-awaited milestone, providing opportunities to explore primate evolution and genetic contributions to human physiology and disease, and both genome-wide analyses and candidate gene studies should be considered complementary.

Initial sequence of the chimpanzee genome and comparison with the human genome

It is found that the patterns of evolution in human and chimpanzee protein-coding genes are highly correlated and dominated by the fixation of neutral and slightly deleterious alleles.

Evolutionary perspectives on the origins of disease

Humans are primates that shared a common ancestor with the so-called ‘great apes’ (chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and bonobos), later emerging out of Africa about 100,000 thousand years ago to

Genomic Comparisons of Humans and Chimpanzees

A draft sequence of the chimpanzee genome is now available, providing opportunities to better understand genetic contributions to human evolution, development, and disease and a few examples of interesting findings resulting from genome-wide analyses, candidate gene studies, and combined approaches.

The first chimpanzee sanctuary in Japan: an attempt to care for the “surplus” of biomedical research

Several aspects of the human–captive chimpanzee bond and the effort to create the first chimpanzee sanctuary in Japan are examined and ethical responsibility for captive chimpanzees that have been used in biomedical research is discussed.

Mammalian comparative genomics and epigenomics

Contributions to the understanding of the structure, function and evolution of the human genome are presented and new methods to map protein-DNA interactions and DNA methylation using single-molecule based sequencing technology are developed.

Where Are We in the Justification of Research Involving Chimpanzees?

It is argued that numerous central ethical issues are neglected, especially ones of justification, and whether the principles offered by the Committee could be used as criteria governing the use of other animals in biomedical and behavioral research.

Biomedical differences between human and nonhuman hominids: potential roles for uniquely human aspects of sialic acid biology.

This work discusses the metabolic incorporation of a diet-derived nonhuman sialic acid, which generates a novel xeno-autoantigen reaction, and chronic inflammation known as xenosialitis.

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES

Sequencing the chimpanzee genome: insights into human evolution and disease

Large-scale sequencing of the chimpanzee genome is now imminent, and chimpanzee–human comparisons are likely to yield molecular insights into how new biological characteristics evolve — findings that might be relevant throughout the tree of life.

A LO G /G ET T Y Fast learner: tool use is one of the traits that sets the great apes apart from most other research animals

  • We also gratefully acknowledge the support of the G. Harold and Leila Y. Mathers Charitable Foundation. J. B
  • 2005