The establishment of an urban bird population.

@article{Rutz2008TheEO,
  title={The establishment of an urban bird population.},
  author={Christian Rutz},
  journal={The Journal of animal ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={77 5},
  pages={
          1008-19
        }
}
  • C. Rutz
  • Published 2008
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of animal ecology
1. Despite the accelerating global spread of urbanized habitats and its associated implications for wildlife and humans, surprisingly little is known about the biology of urban ecosystems. 2. Using data from a 60-year study period, this paper provides a detailed description of how the northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis L.--generally considered a shy forest species--colonized the city of Hamburg, Germany. Six non-mutually exclusive hypotheses are investigated regarding the environmental factors… Expand

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