The erect ‘penis’ is a flag of submission in a female-dominated society: greetings in Serengeti spotted hyenas

@article{East2004TheE,
  title={The erect ‘penis’ is a flag of submission in a female-dominated society: greetings in Serengeti spotted hyenas},
  author={Marion L. East and Heribert Hofer and Wolfgang Wickler},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={33},
  pages={355-370}
}
In East Africa, spotted hyenas live in large clans in a highly structured society dominated by females. A clan is a fission-fusion society where members are often solitary or in small groups. Spotted hyenas have a ritualized greeting during which two individuals stand parallel and face in opposite directions. Both individuals usually lift their hind leg and sniff or lick the anogenital region of the other. The unique aspect of greetings between individuals is the prominent role of the erect… Expand

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