The enigma of the oldest ‘nova’: the central star and nebula of CK Vul

@article{Hajduk2007TheEO,
  title={The enigma of the oldest ‘nova’: the central star and nebula of CK Vul},
  author={M. Hajduk and A. Zijlstra and P. Hoof and J. L{\'o}pez and J. Drew and A. Evans and S. Eyres and K. Gesicki and R. Greimel and F. Kerber and S. Kimeswenger and M. Richer},
  journal={Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
  year={2007},
  volume={378},
  pages={1298-1308}
}
CK Vul is classified as, amongst others, the slowest known nova, a hibernating nova, or a very late thermal pulse object. Following its eruption in AD 1670, the star remained visible for 2 years. A 15-arcsec nebula was discovered in the 1980's, but the star itself has not been detected since the eruption. We here present radio images which reveal an 0.1-arcsec radio source with a flux of 1.5mJy at 5GHz. Deep Himages show a bipolar nebula with a longest extension of 70 arcsec, with the… Expand

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