The enemy hypothesis: correlates of gall morphology with parasitoid attack rates in two closely related rose cynipid galls.

@article{Lszl2013TheEH,
  title={The enemy hypothesis: correlates of gall morphology with parasitoid attack rates in two closely related rose cynipid galls.},
  author={Zolt{\'a}n L{\'a}szl{\'o} and B{\'e}la T{\'o}thm{\'e}r{\'e}sz},
  journal={Bulletin of entomological research},
  year={2013},
  volume={103 3},
  pages={
          326-35
        }
}
We tested the enemy hypothesis for gall morphology on a model system comprising two Diplolepis rose gall wasp species and their associated parasitoids. The enemy hypothesis predicts both that gall traits will influence parasitoid attack rates within species, and that galls with contrasting morphologies will support different parasitoid communities. This hypothesis is supported by studies at both intraspecific and broader taxonomic levels (i.e. between genera), but patterns remain to be explored… 
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