The endophytic continuum.

@article{Schulz2005TheEC,
  title={The endophytic continuum.},
  author={Barbara Joan Schulz and Christine Boyle},
  journal={Mycological research},
  year={2005},
  volume={109 Pt 6},
  pages={
          661-86
        }
}
In spite of the term 'endophyte' being employed for all organisms that inhabit plants, mycologists have come to use the term 'fungal endophyte' for fungi that inhabit plants without causing visible disease symptoms. The term refers only to fungi at the moment of detection without regard for the future status of the interaction. This paper is a review of literature on non-balansiaceous fungi involved in asymptomatic colonisations of plants. These fungal endophytes represent a continuum of fungi… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
Several possible mechanisms by which endophytes may interact with pathogens are discussed in this review.
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is concluded that biotrophy usually represents a derived and evolutionarily stable trait, whereas fungi easily can switch between an endophytic and necrotrophic lifestyle at the evolutionary and even the ecological timescale.
Double lives: transfer of fungal endophytes from leaves to woody substrates
TLDR
The term viaphyte is introduced to refer to fungi that undergo an interim stage as leaf endophytes and, after leaf senescence, colonize other woody substrates via hyphal growth to support the FA hypothesis and suggest that viaphytism may play a significant role in fungal dispersal.
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    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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TLDR
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