The emergence of major cellular processes in evolution

@article{Ouzounis1996TheEO,
  title={The emergence of major cellular processes in evolution},
  author={C. Ouzounis and N. Kyrpides},
  journal={FEBS Letters},
  year={1996},
  volume={390}
}
The phylogenetic distribution of divergently related protein families into the three domains of life (archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes) can signify the presence or absence of entire cellular processes in these domains and their ancestors. We can thus study the emergence of the major transitions during cellular evolution, and resolve some of the controversies surrounding the evolutionary status of archaea and the origins of the eukaryotic cell. In view of the ongoing projects that sequence the… Expand
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LUCA as well as the ancestors of archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes were progenotes: Inference from the distribution and diversity of the reading mechanism of the AUA and AUG codons in the domains of life
  • M. Giulio
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  • Biosyst.
  • 2020
TLDR
Given that this mechanism of modification of the base 34 of the anticodon of an isoleucine tRNA would result to emerge at a stage of the origin of the genetic code - despite in its terminal phases - then all this would imply that the ancestors of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes were progenotes and the LUCA would also be a progenote. Expand
LUCA as well as the ancestors of archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes were progenotes: Inference from the distribution and diversity of the reading mechanism of the AUA and AUG codons in the domains of life.
TLDR
Given that this mechanism of modification of the base 34 of the anticodon of an isoleucine tRNA would result to emerge at a stage of the origin of the genetic code - despite in its terminal phases - then all this would imply that the ancestors of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes were progenotes. Expand
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