The emergence of gender differences in physical aggression in the context of conflict between young peers.

@article{Hay2011TheEO,
  title={The emergence of gender differences in physical aggression in the context of conflict between young peers.},
  author={D. Hay and A. Nash and M. Caplan and Jan Swartzentruber and F. Ishikawa and J. Vespo},
  journal={The British journal of developmental psychology},
  year={2011},
  volume={29 Pt 2},
  pages={
          158-75
        }
}
  • D. Hay, A. Nash, +3 authors J. Vespo
  • Published 2011
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The British journal of developmental psychology
It is well known that a gender difference in physical aggression emerges by the preschool years. We tested the hypothesis that the gender difference is partly due to changing tactics in peer interaction. Observations of girls' and boys' social initiatives and reactions to opportunities for conflict were made, using the Peer Interaction Coding System (PICS) in four independent samples of children between 9 and 36 months of age, which were aggregated to form a summary data set (N= 323), divided… Expand
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