The emergence of depression in adolescence: Development of the prefrontal cortex and the representation of reward

@article{Davey2008TheEO,
  title={The emergence of depression in adolescence: Development of the prefrontal cortex and the representation of reward},
  author={Christopher G. Davey and Murat Y{\"u}cel and Nicholas B. Allen},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2008},
  volume={32},
  pages={1-19}
}
Adolescent development is accompanied by the emergence of a population-wide increase in vulnerability to depression that is maintained through adulthood. We provide a model for understanding how this vulnerability to depression arises, and why depression is so often precipitated by social rejection or loss of status during this phase. There is substantial remodeling and maturation of the dopaminergic reward system and the prefrontal cortex during adolescence, that coincides with the adolescent… Expand
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