The election of Sarah McNutt as the first woman member of the American Neurological Association.

Abstract

The authors investigated the early women physicians of the New York Infirmary for Women and Children and their role in shaping the career and accomplishments of their student and later colleague, Dr. Sarah J. McNutt. These influences eventually led McNutt to be inducted into the American Neurologic Association (ANA). McNutt was educated at the New York Infirmary for Women and Children by early women physicians including Drs. Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell and Mary Putnam Jacobi. McNutt worked to improve the educational opportunities for practicing physicians and nurses by developing postgraduate lectures and organizations. With her early colleagues she developed the New York Infirmary for Women and Children into a reputable hospital and woman's medical college. One of the consultants to the New York Infirmary for Women and Children was Royal W. Amidon, secretary of the ANA in 1883. McNutt's close association with the Clinical Society of the New York Post Graduate Medical School and Hospital brought her into direct contact with other prominent ANA members including C.L. Dana and W.A. Hammond. In 1884, McNutt was nominated by Amidon and Hammond as the first woman member to the ANA and was elected. Her ANA thesis was Double Infantile Spastic Hemiplegia. McNutt was elected into the ANA at a time when women physicians were first being recognized and included into mainstream medicine. Her historic election acknowledged her accomplishments and highlighted the proactive role of the early ANA in forging new medical policies in the United States.

Cite this paper

@article{Horn2002TheEO, title={The election of Sarah McNutt as the first woman member of the American Neurological Association.}, author={Stacy S Horn and Christopher Goetz}, journal={Neurology}, year={2002}, volume={59 1}, pages={113-7} }