The efficacy of infection surveillance and control programs in preventing nosocomial infections in US hospitals.

@article{Haley1985TheEO,
  title={The efficacy of infection surveillance and control programs in preventing nosocomial infections in US hospitals.},
  author={Robert W. Haley and David H. Culver and J W White and W. Meade Morgan and Teiji Emori and V P Munn and Thomas M. Hooton},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={1985},
  volume={121 2},
  pages={
          182-205
        }
}
In a representative sample of US general hospitals, the authors found that the establishment of intensive infection surveillance and control programs was strongly associated with reductions in rates of nosocomial urinary tract infection, surgical wound infection, pneumonia, and bacteremia between 1970 and 1975-1976, after controlling for other characteristics of the hospitals and their patients. Essential components of effective programs included conducting organized surveillance and control… Expand
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References

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The emergence of infection surveillance and control programs in US hospitals: an assessment, 1976.
TLDR
Although the adoption of selected infection control policies and practices has varied widely, chronological data indicate that a major infection control movement has emerged since 1970. Expand
Progress report on the evaluation of the efficacy of infection surveillance and control programs.
TLDR
Find that the over-all infection rates, standardized for important confounding variables or covariates, in hospitals with higher intensity programs had increased less from 1970 to 1975-1976 than those of hospitals with low intensity programs would indicate the efficacy of these programs. Expand
Increased recognition of infectious diseases in US hospitals through increased use of diagnostic tests, 1970-1976.
TLDR
Rates of performing urine cultures and reporting colony counts were highly correlated with observed rates of nosocomial urinary tract infection and indicate that the nationwide increase in the use of these diagnostic tests increased the recognition of infectious diseases in US hospitals. Expand
The nationwide nosocomial infection rate. A new need for vital statistics.
TLDR
If adjustments are made for the accuracy of the diagnostic method, the increasing nationwide secular trend, and the number of nosocomial infections in nursing homes, however, as many as 4 million nosocomIAL infections per year may now be occurring. Expand
Adverse effects of nosocomial infection.
The effects of noscomial infection on duration of hospital stay and outcome of hospitalization were measured by matching two control patients to each of 85 patients found to have qctive nosocomialExpand
Effect of an infection surveillance and control program on the accuracy of retrospective chart review.
TLDR
The authors conclude that, if an ISCP effect on RCR accuracy is present at all, it must be small. Expand
The SENIC Project. Study on the efficacy of nosocomial infection control (SENIC Project). Summary of study design.
TLDR
Analysis is underway to identify approaches to infection control that are most effective for the least cost to hospitals and to point out additional specific questions to be answered by future research. Expand
Identifying patients at high risk of surgical wound infection. A simple multivariate index of patient susceptibility and wound contamination.
TLDR
The authors used information collected on 58,498 patients undergoing operations in 1970 to develop a simple multivariate risk index and found that a subgroup, consisting of half the surgical patients, can be identified in whom 90% of the surgical wound infections will develop. Expand
A five-year prospective study of 23,649 surgical wounds.
TLDR
Analysis of surgical wounds showed a reduction in the rate of infection in those using a hexachlorophene wash before operation and those whose operation site was not shaved, while no reduction or increase was observed when plastic skin drapes were used or when different hand-scrub preparations were used. Expand
Contamination of mechanical ventilators with tubing changes every 24 or 48 hours.
TLDR
The absence of a significant difference in inspiratory-phase-gas contamination or tubing colonization suggests that ventilator tubing need be changed only every 48 hours. Expand
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