The effects of smoking on bone health.

@article{Wong2007TheEO,
  title={The effects of smoking on bone health.},
  author={Peter K K Wong and Jemma J. Christie and John Dennis Wark},
  journal={Clinical science},
  year={2007},
  volume={113 5},
  pages={
          233-41
        }
}
Osteoporotic fractures are a major public health problem in most developed countries and an increasing concern in much of the developing world. This healthcare burden will increase significantly worldwide over the next 20 years due to aging of the population. Smoking is a key lifestyle risk factor for bone loss and fractures that appears to be independent of other risk factors for fracture such as age, weight, sex and menopausal status. This review discusses the effects of smoking on bone… 

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