The effects of self-disclosure and non self-disclosure of stuttering on listeners' perceptions of a person who stutters.

@article{Healey2007TheEO,
  title={The effects of self-disclosure and non self-disclosure of stuttering on listeners' perceptions of a person who stutters.},
  author={E. Charles Healey and Rodney M. Gabel and Derek E Daniels and Nori Kawai},
  journal={Journal of fluency disorders},
  year={2007},
  volume={32 1},
  pages={51-69}
}
UNLABELLED The aim of this study was to examine listener perceptions of an adult male person who stutters (PWS) who did or did not disclose his stuttering. Ninety adults who do not stutter individually viewed one of three videotaped monologues produced by a male speaker with severe stuttering. In one monologue, 30 listeners heard the speaker disclose stuttering at the beginning and in another monologue, 30 listeners heard the speaker disclose stuttering at the end. A third group of 30 listeners… CONTINUE READING

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Behavioral treatments for children and adults who stutter: a review

Psychology research and behavior management • 2013
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self-disclosing benefits those who stutter by reducing anxiety or tension about hiding stuttering from a listener, and improving social interactions with people who do not stutter (Bloodstein

Breitenfeldt, Lorenz, Collins, Blood
Van Riper, • 1995

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