The effects of red and blue light on alertness and mood at night

@article{Plitnick2010TheEO,
  title={The effects of red and blue light on alertness and mood at night},
  author={Barbara A Plitnick and MG Figueiro and Brittany Wood and Mark S. Rea},
  journal={Lighting Research \& Technology},
  year={2010},
  volume={42},
  pages={449 - 458}
}
This study was designed to explore the roles that long- and short-wavelength lights have on momentary mood and alertness at night. Twenty-two subjects participated in a mixed-design experiment, where we measured the impact of two levels of long- and short-wavelength lights on brain activity and on self-assessments of alertness, sleepiness and mood. Measurements were obtained 60 minutes prior to, during and after light exposure. Results showed that the red and the blue lights increased… 

Figures from this paper

Effect of long-wavelength light on electroencephalogram and subjective alertness
This study extends previous findings on the effect of different levels of short-wavelength light on human alertness. This study explores the alerting ability of long-wavelength light at two levels
Influence of the Spectral Quality of Light on Daytime Alertness Levels in Humans
TLDR
The present study investigated whether noon time exposure to red light would increase both objective and subjective measures of alertness such as those measured by EEG, cognitive-behavioral performance, and subjective sleepiness, and concluded that behavioral effects of light at noon are very limited at best.
LED lighting effect on sleep, sleepiness, mood and vigor
TLDR
The effect of cool LED lighting exposure during daily hours has been investigated in two experiments: self-reported sleep, sleepiness, mood and physical vigor have been assessed prior and post light exposure using bipolar scales (KSS and GVAS) and sleep diary.
Light at Night and Measures of Alertness and Performance
TLDR
Red light can improve measures of alertness, but it can also improve certain types of performance at night without affecting melatonin levels, which could have significant practical applications for nurses.
Effect of intensity of short-wavelength light on electroencephalogram and subjective alertness
TLDR
The results show that the effect of intensity on alertness is not linear and further work should be done to investigate the threshold intensity that is required to produce an alerting effect.
EFFECT OF INTENSITY OF SHORT-WAVELENGTH LIGHT ON SUBJECTIVE AND OBJECTIVE ALERTNESS
TLDR
The results showed that the effect of intensity on alertness is not linear and further work should be done to investigate the threshold intensity that is required to produce alerting effect.
Alerting effects of daytime light exposure – a proposed link between light exposure and brain mechanisms
TLDR
The brain mechanisms involved in light-induced daytime alertness are described and a novel model of two parallel mechanisms, suggested that light can use the amygdala in the limbic system to send signals to the cerebral cortex, is proposed.
A Comparison of Blue Light and Caffeine Effects on Cognitive Function and Alertness in Humans
TLDR
Overall, blue light and caffeine demonstrated distinct effects on aspects of psychomotor function and have the potential to positively influence a range of settings where cognitive function and alertness are important.
Effects of light intervention on alertness and mental performance during the post-lunch dip: a multi-measure study
TLDR
The present findings suggest that both RWL and BWL, compared to NWL condition, can improve the physiological correlates of alertness in EEG measurements, however, these changes did not translate to improvements in task performance and subjective alertness.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 24 REFERENCES
On light as an alerting stimulus at night.
TLDR
Both measures of alertness were highly correlated with model predictions of nocturnal melatonin suppression for the same circadian light stimulus, consistent with the inference that the suprachiasmatic nuclei play an important role in noct nighttime alertness as well as circadian regulation.
Preliminary evidence that both blue and red light can induce alertness at night
TLDR
Findings support previous findings that alertness may be mediated by the circadian system, but it does not seem to be the only light-sensitive pathway that can affect alertness at night.
High sensitivity of human melatonin, alertness, thermoregulation, and heart rate to short wavelength light.
TLDR
The findings-that the sensitivity of the human alerting response to light and its thermoregulatory sequelae are blue-shifted relative to the three-cone visual photopic system-indicate an additional role for these novel photoreceptors in modifying human alertness, thermophysiology, and heart rate.
Subjective and objective sleepiness in the active individual.
TLDR
The results support the notion that ambulatory EEG/EOG changes may be used to quantify sleepiness and suggest physiological changes due to sleepiness are not likely to occur until extreme sleepiness is encountered.
A neural circuit for circadian regulation of arousal
TLDR
The necessary elements for a circuit that provides circadian regulation of arousal are described and mechanisms for regulation of circadian and sleep–waking functions are revealed.
Color and psychological functioning: the effect of red on performance attainment.
TLDR
The findings suggest that care must be taken in how red is used in achievement contexts and illustrate how color can act as a subtle environmental cue that has important influences on behavior.
Effects of Four Psychological Primary Colors on GSR, Heart Rate and Respiration Rate
TLDR
Red was significantly more arousing than blue or yellow or yellow and green more than blue, and greenmore than blue on GSR.
The action of sedatives on brain stem oculomotor systems in man.
  • H. Norris
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Neuropharmacology
  • 1971
...
1
2
3
...