The effects of psychological stress on humans: increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a Th1-like response in stress-induced anxiety.

@article{Maes1998TheEO,
  title={The effects of psychological stress on humans: increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a Th1-like response in stress-induced anxiety.},
  author={Michael Maes and Cai Fang Song and Amerson Lin and Raf de Jongh and A C van Gastel and Gunter R L Kenis and Eug{\`e}ne Bosmans and Ingrid De Meester and Ina H. Benoy and Hugo M Neels and Paul Demedts and Aleksandar Janca and Simon S Scharp{\'e} and Robin S Smith},
  journal={Cytokine},
  year={1998},
  volume={10 4},
  pages={313-8}
}
There is some evidence that, in humans and experimental animals, psychological stress may suppress or enhance immune functions, depending on the nature of the stressor and the immune variables under consideration. The possibility that psychological stress may affect the production of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines was investigated in 38 medical students, who had blood samplings a few weeks before and after as well as one day before an academic examination. Psychological stress… CONTINUE READING
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