The effects of perceived stigma and psychological over-control on the behavioural problems of children with epilepsy

Abstract

This pilot study finds that parents who think that their child will be stigmatized and who perceive that epilepsy limits their child, report higher levels of four child behavioural problems than reported by other parents of children with epilepsy. Those children with epilepsy who report that their parents use an over-controlling psychological approach to parenting report higher levels of four behavioural problems than those children with epilepsy who do not report over-controlling behaviour from their parents. The effects of simple partial seizures and of seizure severity on children's behavioural problems are completely mediated by perceived stigma, perceived limitations, and perceived parenting. Seizure frequency, absence seizures, and treatment with ethosuximide have direct effects on three children's behavioural problems; the effects of these medical variables are generally unaffected by control for parent's and children's perceptions.

DOI: 10.1016/S1059-1311(97)80038-6

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@article{CarltonFord1997TheEO, title={The effects of perceived stigma and psychological over-control on the behavioural problems of children with epilepsy}, author={Steve Carlton-Ford and Robin Miller and Nichol Nealeigh and Nelson Felix S{\'a}nchez}, journal={Seizure}, year={1997}, volume={6}, pages={383-391} }