The effects of passive heating and head-cooling on perception of exercise in the heat

@article{Simmons2007TheEO,
  title={The effects of passive heating and head-cooling on perception of exercise in the heat},
  author={Shona E. Simmons and Toby M{\"u}ndel and David A Jones},
  journal={European Journal of Applied Physiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={104},
  pages={281-288}
}
AbstractThe capacity to perform exercise is reduced in a hot environment when compared to cooler conditions. A limiting factor appears to be a higher core body temperature (Tcore) and it has been suggested that an elevated Tcore reduces the drive to exercise, this being reflected in higher ratings of perceived exertion (RPE). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether passive heating to increase Tcore would have a detrimental effect on RPE and thermal comfort during subsequent… Expand
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