The effects of movement direction and hemispace on estimates of distance traveled.

@article{Foster2007TheEO,
  title={The effects of movement direction and hemispace on estimates of distance traveled.},
  author={Paul S Foster and Gregory P. Crucian and Valeria Drago and David W. Burks and Jeannine Mielke and Brian Vincent Shenal and Robert D. Rhodes and Laura J Grande and Kyle B. Womack and Alonso Riesta and Kenneth M Heilman},
  journal={Brain and cognition},
  year={2007},
  volume={64 2},
  pages={184-8}
}
BACKGROUND/HYPOTHESIS The degree of attention directed to a stimulus and the presence of anisometric representations can alter the perception of the magnitude of a stimulus. We wanted to learn if normal right-handed subjects' estimates of distance traveled are influenced by the right-left direction or hemispace of movements. METHODS We had blindfolded… CONTINUE READING