The effects of mild and severe traumatic brain injury on speed of information processing as measured by the computerized tests of information processing (CTIP).

@article{Tombaugh2007TheEO,
  title={The effects of mild and severe traumatic brain injury on speed of information processing as measured by the computerized tests of information processing (CTIP).},
  author={Tom N. Tombaugh and Laura Rees and Peter Stormer and Allyson G. Harrison and Andra Smith},
  journal={Archives of clinical neuropsychology : the official journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists},
  year={2007},
  volume={22 1},
  pages={25-36}
}
In spite of the fact that reaction time (RT) measures are sensitive to the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI), few RT procedures have been developed for use in standard clinical evaluations. The computerized test of information processing (CTIP) [Tombaugh, T. N., & Rees, L. (2000). Manual for the computerized tests of information processing (CTIP). Ottawa, Ont.: Carleton University] was designed to measure the degree to which TBI decreases the speed at which information is processed. The… CONTINUE READING

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