The effects of message quality and congruency on perceptions of tailored health communications.

@article{Updegraff2007TheEO,
  title={The effects of message quality and congruency on perceptions of tailored health communications.},
  author={John A Updegraff and David Keith Sherman and Faith S. Luyster and Traci L Mann},
  journal={Journal of experimental social psychology},
  year={2007},
  volume={43 2},
  pages={
          249-257
        }
}
Recent research has documented the effectiveness of tailoring health behavior change messages to characteristics of the recipients, but little is known about the processes underlying these effects. Drawing from the elaboration likelihood model (Petty & Cacioppo, 1986), we examined the role of message scrutiny in moderating the congruency effect (Mann, Sherman, & Updegraff, 2004). One hundred and thirty-six undergraduate participants read either a strong or weak message promoting regular dental… CONTINUE READING
BETA

Similar Papers

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 67 CITATIONS, ESTIMATED 84% COVERAGE

MADD MESSAGE EFFECTS: A TWELVE-YEAR RANDOMIZED TRIAL

VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
CITES RESULTS & BACKGROUND
HIGHLY INFLUENCED

FILTER CITATIONS BY YEAR

2007
2019

CITATION STATISTICS

  • 8 Highly Influenced Citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 29 REFERENCES

Dispositional motivations and message framing: a test of the congruency hypothesis in college students.

  • Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
  • 2004
VIEW 4 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Why are you bringing up condoms now? The effect of message content on framing effects of condom use messages.

  • Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
  • 2005

The effects of message framing and ethnic targeting on mammography use among low-income women.

  • Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association
  • 2001
VIEW 2 EXCERPTS