The effects of high-flow vs low-flow oxygen on exercise in advanced obstructive airways disease.

@article{Chatila2004TheEO,
  title={The effects of high-flow vs low-flow oxygen on exercise in advanced obstructive airways disease.},
  author={Wissam Chatila and Thomas Nugent and Gwendolyn B. Vance and John P Gaughan and Gerard J. Criner},
  journal={Chest},
  year={2004},
  volume={126 4},
  pages={
          1108-15
        }
}
STUDY OBJECTIVES Current options to enhance exercise performance in patients with COPD are limited. This study compared the effects of high flows of humidified oxygen to conventional low-flow oxygen (LFO) delivery at rest and during exercise in patients with COPD. DESIGN Prospective, nonrandomized, nonblinded study. SETTING Outpatient exercise laboratory. PATIENTS Ten patients with COPD, stable with no exacerbation, and advanced airflow obstruction (age, 54 +/- 6 years; FEV(1), 23 +/- 6… 

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