The effects of habitual footwear use: foot shape and function in native barefoot walkers

@article{DAot2009TheEO,
  title={The effects of habitual footwear use: foot shape and function in native barefoot walkers},
  author={Kristiaan D'Ao{\^u}t and Todd C. Pataky and Dirk De Clercq and Peter Aerts},
  journal={Footwear Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={1},
  pages={81 - 94}
}
The human foot was anatomically modern long before footwear was invented, and is adapted to barefoot walking on natural substrates. Understanding the biomechanics of habitually barefoot walkers can provide novel insights both for anthropologist and for applied scientists, yet the necessary data is virtually non-existent. To start assessing morphological and functional effects of the habitual use of footwear, we have studied a population of habitually barefoot walkers from India (n = 70), and… Expand
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