The effects of environmental hormones on reproduction

@article{Danzo1998TheEO,
  title={The effects of environmental hormones on reproduction},
  author={Benjamin J. Danzo},
  journal={Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS},
  year={1998},
  volume={54},
  pages={1249-1264}
}
  • B. J. Danzo
  • Published 1 November 1998
  • Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS
Abstract. Considerable attention has been given in the past few years to the possibility that man-made chemicals (xenobiotics) in the environment may pose a hazard to human reproductive health. The endocrine-disrupting effects of many xenobiotics can be interpreted as interference with the normal regulation of reproductive processes by steroid hormones. Evidence reviewed here indicates that xenobiotics bind to androgen and oestrogen receptors in target tissues, and to androgen-binding protein… 
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