The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy as an anti-depressive treatment is falling: A meta-analysis.

@article{Johnsen2015TheEO,
  title={The effects of cognitive behavioral therapy as an anti-depressive treatment is falling: A meta-analysis.},
  author={Tom J. Johnsen and Oddgeir Friborg},
  journal={Psychological bulletin},
  year={2015},
  volume={141 4},
  pages={
          747-68
        }
}
A meta-analysis examining temporal changes (time trends) in the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as a treatment for unipolar depression was conducted. [] Key Method A comprehensive search of psychotherapy trials yielded 70 eligible studies from 1977 to 2014. Effect sizes (ES) were quantified as Hedge's g based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Rates of remission were also registered.
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This meta-analysis examines temporal changes (time trends) in the effects of group cognitive–behavioral therapy (GCBT) as a treatment for unipolar depression. In this exploratory study, 37 studies
The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Are Not Systematically Falling: A Revision of Johnsen and Friborg (2015)
TLDR
Year of publication does not appear to be a reliable and independent moderator of the effectiveness of CBT for depression, and the linear “fall” reported by Johnsen and Friborg (2015) is most likely a spurious finding.
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TLDR
CBT and SSRIs for depression were both associated with moderate improvements in QOL, but are possibly caused by different mechanisms.
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TLDR
A meta-analysis to explore the temporal development of the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for current depression in studies that used the Beck Depression Inventory or the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale as outcome measures showed that MBCT is effective in reducing depressive symptoms.
The Effects of Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy for Depression Are Not Falling: A Re-Analysis of Johnsen and Friborg (2015)
TLDR
The declining effect of CBT for depression observed by Johnsen and Friborg (2015) was highly influenced by 22 studies published before 1995 and that the 48 studies published after 1995 did not demonstrate such a decline.
Meta-analysis and Meta-regression of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis (CBTp) Across Time: The Effectiveness of CBTp has Improved for Delusions
Published research shows small-to-medium effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis (CBTp) on reducing psychotic symptoms. Given the on-going development of CBTp interventions, the aim
Four Decades of Outcome Research on Psychotherapies for Adult Depression: An Overview of a Series of Meta-Analyses
In the past 4 decades about 500 randomized trials have examined the effects of psychological treatments of adult depression. In this article the results of a series of meta-analyses of these trials
The effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy as an antidepressive treatment is falling: Reply to Ljòtsson et al. (2017) and Cristea et al. (2017).
This article critically reassesses the nonlinear reanalysis by Ljótsson, Hedman, Mattsson, and Andersson (2017) and reviews Cristea et al.'s (2017) extension of our original meta-analysis (Johnsen &
The contribution of depressive ‘disorder characteristics’ to determinations of prognosis for adults with depression: an individual patient data meta-analysis
TLDR
When adults seek treatment for depression clinicians should routinely assess for the duration of anxiety, duration of depression, comorbid panic disorder, and a history of antidepressant treatment alongside depressive symptom severity, to elucidate prognosis and aid the clinical management of depression.
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