The effects of an unexpected spider stimulus on skin conductance responses and eye movements: an inattentional blindness study

@article{Wiemer2013TheEO,
  title={The effects of an unexpected spider stimulus on skin conductance responses and eye movements: an inattentional blindness study},
  author={Julian Wiemer and Antje B. M. Gerdes and Paul Pauli},
  journal={Psychological Research},
  year={2013},
  volume={77},
  pages={155-166}
}
Are spiders evolutionarily relevant threat cues that capture attention automatically and preattentively—also in non-fearful persons? Previous studies concerning this question did not examine responses to unexpected spider stimuli, although this is an ecologically valid situation. Therefore, we conducted an inattentional blindness (IB) experiment. While unselected participants (N = 120) were focusing their attention on a visual discrimination task, suddenly a spider or a flower image appeared… 

Threat-relevant stimuli cannot be better detected by preschoolers in an inattentional blindness task

It is demonstrated that the threat-superiority effect on IB does not occur on preschoolers and the individual difference of preschoolers' IB is unstable, and the cognition of young children's attentional bias to threat-relevant stimuli is enriched.