The effects of acute psychological stress on circulating inflammatory factors in humans: A review and meta-analysis

@article{Steptoe2007TheEO,
  title={The effects of acute psychological stress on circulating inflammatory factors in humans: A review and meta-analysis},
  author={Andrew Steptoe and Mark Hamer and Yoichi Chida},
  journal={Brain, Behavior, and Immunity},
  year={2007},
  volume={21},
  pages={901-912}
}
Stress influences circulating inflammatory markers, and these effects may mediate the influence of psychosocial factors on cardiovascular risk and other conditions such as psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. Inflammatory responses can be investigated under controlled experimental conditions in humans, and evidence is beginning to emerge showing that circulating inflammatory factors respond to acute psychological stress under laboratory conditions. However, research published to date has varied… 
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    International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
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TLDR
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