The effects of a split sleep–wake schedule on neurobehavioural performance and predictions of performance under conditions of forced desynchrony

@article{Kosmadopoulos2014TheEO,
  title={The effects of a split sleep–wake schedule on neurobehavioural performance and predictions of performance under conditions of forced desynchrony},
  author={Anastasi Kosmadopoulos and Charli Sargent and David Darwent and Xuan Zhou and Drew Dawson and Gregory D. Roach},
  journal={Chronobiology International},
  year={2014},
  volume={31},
  pages={1209 - 1217}
}
Extended wakefulness, sleep loss, and circadian misalignment are factors associated with an increased accident risk in shiftwork. Splitting shifts into multiple shorter periods per day may mitigate these risks by alleviating prior wake. However, the effect of splitting the sleep–wake schedule on the homeostatic and circadian contributions to neurobehavioural performance and subjective assessments of one’s ability to perform are not known. Twenty-nine male participants lived in a time isolation… 
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