The effects of a bumble bee nectar robber on plant reproductive success and pollinator behavior.

@article{Maloof2001TheEO,
  title={The effects of a bumble bee nectar robber on plant reproductive success and pollinator behavior.},
  author={Joan Maloof},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2001},
  volume={88 11},
  pages={
          1960-5
        }
}
  • J. Maloof
  • Published 1 November 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of botany
Interactions between a plant species (Corydalis caseana), a bumble bee nectar robber (Bombus occidentalis), and a bumble bee pollinator (B. appositus) were studied. There were no significant differences between naturally robbed and unrobbed flowers in fruit set or mean seed set per fruit. Plots of C. caseana plants were subjected to treatments of robbing and no robbing using commercially available colonies of B. occidentalis. Robbers did not pollinate the flowers. Pollinator behavior was… Expand
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Relationship between floral tube length and nectar robbing in Duranta erecta L. (Verbenaceae)
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Nectar robbing improves male reproductive success of the endangered Aconitum napellus ssp. lusitanicum
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It is demonstrated that A. napellus does not suffer from nectar robbery but may rather benefit via improved pollen dispersal and thus, male reproductive success. Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of botany
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The results suggest that the effect of nectar robbers on plant reproductive success is dependent both on the robbers' behavior and on flower/inflorescence structure. Expand
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The results indicate that hummingbird avoidance of nectar-robbed plants and flowers reduces plant fitness components and suggests that the mutualisms between pollinators and host plants may be affected by other species, such as nectar robbers. Expand
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It is suggested that nectar robbing has little effect on plant fecundity because legitimate foragers are present in the population, and that seed predation and seed abortion after fertilization may be more important factors in limiting seed production in this species. Expand
Pollinator Foraging, Experimental Nectar-robbing and Plant Fitness in Impatiens capensis
TLDR
Because seed set was statistically indistinguishable for robbed and unrobbed blossoms, nectar-robbing may thus actually enhance female fitness in L capensis and make it more likely that the main purpose of the chasmogamous flowers of I. capensis was achieved. Expand
ARE NECTAR ROBBERS CHEATERS OR MUTUALISTS
TLDR
The effects of nectar robbers are complex and depend, in part, on the identity of the robber, the Identity of the legitimate pollinator, how much nectar the robbers remove, and the variety of floral resources available in the environment. Expand
Reproductive biology of a North American subalpine plant: Corydalis caseana A. Gray ssp. brandegei (S. Watson) G. B. Ownbey
TLDR
Results suggest a possibility of inbreeding depression in Corydalis caseana, a perennial plant that grows in moist, subalpine regions of south central Colorado, USA, and has a mixed-mating system. Expand
Foraging bumblebees avoid flowers already visited by conspecifics or by other bumblebee species
TLDR
Examination of detection of recently visited flowers in a mixed community of bumblebees foraging on comfrey, Symphytum officinale, in southern England concludes that these Bombus species are probably using scent marks left by previous visitors. Expand
Bumble Bee Foraging: The Threshold Departure Rule
The response of queen bumble bees (Bombus appositus) to variations in the distribution and abundance of nectar in multiflowered Delphinium nelsonii inflorescences was used to identify a general ruleExpand
Robber‐like pollinators: overwintered queen bumblebees foraging on Corydalis ambigua
TLDR
Close observation confirmed that the illegitimate foragers opened the inner petals enclosing anthers and stigma frequently when visiting the front of the flowers before robbing, or occasionally when walking about on the flowers or collecting nectar through the perforated spurs. Expand
Pollination ecology of Petrocoptis grandiflora Rothm. (Caryophyllaceae); a species endemic to the north-west part of the Iberian Peninsula
TLDR
The incidence of nectar robbing by Xylocopa violacea differed between the four plant populations studied, and it had significant effects on fruit set when the population was simultaneously considered and Supplementary pollination did not improve fruit set significantly. Expand
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