The effects of 1 week of REM sleep deprivation on parvalbumin and calbindin immunoreactive neurons in central visual pathways of kittens

@article{Hogan2001TheEO,
  title={The effects of 1 week of REM sleep deprivation on parvalbumin and calbindin immunoreactive neurons in central visual pathways of kittens},
  author={D. Hogan and H. Roffwarg and J. Shaffery},
  journal={Journal of Sleep Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={10}
}
Many maturational processes in the brain are at high levels prenatally as well as neonatally before eye‐opening, when extrinsic sensory stimulation is limited. During these periods of rapid brain development, a large percentage of time is spent in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a state characterized by high levels of endogenously produced brain activity. The abundance of REM sleep in early life and its ensuing decline to lower levels in adulthood strongly suggest that REM sleep constitutes an… Expand
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