The effects and consequences of very large explosive volcanic eruptions

@article{Self2006TheEA,
  title={The effects and consequences of very large explosive volcanic eruptions},
  author={Stephen Self},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={364},
  pages={2073 - 2097}
}
  • S. Self
  • Published 15 August 2006
  • Geology, Environmental Science
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Every now and again Earth experiences tremendous explosive volcanic eruptions, considerably bigger than the largest witnessed in historic times. Those yielding more than 450 km3 of magma have been called super-eruptions. The record of such eruptions is incomplete; the most recent known example occurred 26 000 years ago. It is more likely that the Earth will next experience a super-eruption than an impact from a large meteorite greater than 1 km in diameter. Depending on where the volcano is… 

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