The effectiveness of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (TTNS) for adults with overactive bladder syndrome: A systematic review

@article{Booth2018TheEO,
  title={The effectiveness of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (TTNS) for adults with overactive bladder syndrome: A systematic review},
  author={Jo Booth and Lesley Connelly and Sylvia Dickson and Fiona Duncan and Maggie Lawrence},
  journal={Neurourology and Urodynamics},
  year={2018},
  volume={37},
  pages={528 - 541}
}
To evaluate effectiveness of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (TTNS) for treating adults with overactive bladder (OAB) of idiopathic or neurogenic origin, using a systematic review of the literature. 

Efficacy of percutaneous and transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation on idiopathic overactive bladder and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

A systematic review and meta‐analysis on the efficacy and safety of these therapeutic methods showed a promising effect on overactive bladder (OAB) and interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome is given.

Pilot study evaluating the effects of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation on urinary symptoms in female patients with multiple sclerosis reporting overactive bladder

Transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation opens up the possibility of home-based neuromodulation, however, the evidence base is rather limited.

Non‐inferior and more feasible transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation in treating overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

This systematic review and meta‐analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (TTNS) versus percutaneousTibial nerves stimulation (PTNS) or anticholinergic drugs in reducing symptoms and improving the quality of life for OAB patients.

Percutaneous versus Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation of the Posterior Tibial Nerve in Idiopathic Overactive Bladder Syndrome with Urinary Incontinence in Adults: A Systematic Review

TTNS has advantages over PTNS as it is more comfortable for the patient even though there is equality of both therapies in the outcome variables, and the greatest effectiveness, in reducing UI and in other parameters of daily voiding and quality of life, was obtained.

Effects of Transcutaneous and Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation in Bosnian Female Patients with an Idiopathic Overactive Urinary Bladder.

Good efficacy of both TTNS and PTNS in the treatment of OAB is suggested, as it leads to a statistically significant reduction in symptoms as well as an improvement in quality of life, without side effects.

Effectiveness of the transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation and pelvic floor muscle training with biofeedback in women with multiple sclerosis for the management of overactive bladder

This study demonstrates the efficacy of both TTNS and PFMT for managing OAB symptoms in MS, associated with a significant impact on QoL, but did not show superiority of the methods.

Do Failure of Posterior Tibial Nerve Stimulation Precludes to Use Sacral Neuromodulation in Patient With Overactive Bladder?

SNM might improve OAB symptoms in most patients who experienced no or poor efficacy with TPT NS, and history of failed TPTNS should not preclude the use of SNM in OAB patients.

Feasibility and acceptability of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for the treatment of bladder storage symptoms among people with multiple sclerosis

TTNS is feasible, safe, and acceptable for PwMS, and future implications need to consider the treatment protocol including frequency of treatment sessions, duration of treatment, and the electrical stimulation parameters as well as the outcome measures followed in the current study for the implementation of the future pilot RCT.
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References

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Transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome in multiple sclerosis: Results of a multicenter prospective study

The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the noninvasive technique of transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation in patients with multiple sclerosis and troublesome symptoms of an overactive bladder (OAB).

Effectiveness of percutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation for overactive bladder: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

To evaluate the effectiveness of posterior percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in treating overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms by systematic review of the literature, a large number of patients with OABs are diagnosed with central giant cell granuloma.

Effects of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation on adult patients with overactive bladder syndrome: A systematic review

To assess the effectiveness of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) on adult patients with overactive bladder syndrome, using a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs),

Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) efficacy in the treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunctions: a systematic review

PTNS is an effective and safe option to treat OAB patients and further studies are needed to assess the role of PTNS in the remaining indications and to evaluate the long term durability of the treatment.

Transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation: evaluation of a therapeutic option in the management of anticholinergic refractory overactive bladder

TPTNS is well tolerated and is effective in one half of the patients studied after they failed anticholinergic treatment, and could become a second therapeutic option before surgical treatment in the management strategy of OAB.

The efficacy of posterior tibial nerve stimulation for the treatment of overactive bladder in women: a systematic review

Limited high quality data exist on PTNS for OAB in women, and although initial studies have demonstrated promise, more comprehensive evaluation of PTNS is needed to support its universal use for the treatment of O AB in women.

Urodynamic effect of acute transcutaneous posterior tibial nerve stimulation in overactive bladder.

Improved bladder overactivity is an encouraging argument to propose posterior tibial nerve stimulation as a noninvasive treatment modality in clinical practice and an objective acute effect of posterior tibia nerve stimulation on urodynamic parameters is suggested.

NEUROMODULATION FOR OVERACTIVE BLADDER WITH TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL NERVE STIMULATION IN ADULTS - A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL STUDY

The study concluded that TENS is safe and acceptable with potential clinical effects in reducing symptoms of OAB in adult participants.

Randomized trial of transcutaneous tibial nerve stimulation to treat urge urinary incontinence in older women

TTNS showed significant improvement in most areas of QoL and in UUI parameters when compared with the control group, and is efficacious to treat UUI in older women.
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