The effect of water fluoridation and social inequalities on dental caries in 5-year-old children.

@article{Riley1999TheEO,
  title={The effect of water fluoridation and social inequalities on dental caries in 5-year-old children.},
  author={James C. Riley and Michael A Lennon and Roger P Ellwood},
  journal={International journal of epidemiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={28 2},
  pages={
          300-5
        }
}
BACKGROUND Many studies have shown that water fluoridation dramatically reduces dental caries, but the effect that water fluoridation has upon reducing dental health inequalities is less clear. The aim of this study is to describe the effect that water fluoridation has upon the association between material deprivation and dental caries experience in 5-year-old children. METHODS It is an ecological descriptive study of dental caries experience using previously obtained data from the British… 

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