The effect of ultrasonic intensity on the crystal structure of palm oil.

Abstract

It has been known for a long time that both the crystal structure and kinetics of crystallisation can be affected by ultrasound. In the past systems used have relied on high power ultrasonic probes to produce crystals. The majority of these probes produce cavitation in the system and it has been difficult to differentiate between effects caused by the ultrasound alone or by the cavitation produced by ultrasound on the crystal structure. Some materials, such as fats, are very susceptible to the production of free radicals that lead to "off-flavours" being obtained. These "off-flavours" are easily produced when the standard high power probes are used. This has meant that, although the crystal structure of the final product might be improved, the presence of 'off' flavours has prevented ultrasound being considered as a commercial technique for the crystallisation of edible fats. At Unilever R&D a system has been developed which can investigate the effect of ultrasound on the crystallisation of fats under controlled conditions covering a range of intensities and cooling rates. The intensity levels used were both below and above the cavitational threshold. By keeping the cooling regime constant it has been possible to show that the structure of the final product can vary from a material looking similar to cottage cheese through to a fine cream simply by varying the ultrasonic intensity. This paper describes the effect of ultrasound on both the crystal structure and kinetics of palm oil crystallisation at intensities below and above the cavitational threshold.

Cite this paper

@article{Patrick2004TheEO, title={The effect of ultrasonic intensity on the crystal structure of palm oil.}, author={Maria Patrick and Renoo Blindt and Jo Janssen}, journal={Ultrasonics sonochemistry}, year={2004}, volume={11 3-4}, pages={251-5} }