The effect of the last glacial age on speciation and population genetic structure of the endangered Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis)

@article{Gottelli2004TheEO,
  title={The effect of the last glacial age on speciation and population genetic structure of the endangered Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis)},
  author={Dada Gottelli and Jorgelina Marino and C. Sillero‐Zubiri and Stephan Michael Funk},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={13}
}
During the last glacial age, Afro‐alpine habitats were widespread across the highlands of Ethiopia. A wolf‐like canid ancestor is thought to have colonized this expanding habitat and given rise to a new species that was remarkably well adapted to the high altitude environment: the Ethiopian wolf Canis simensis. Here, we address the timing of genetic divergence and examine population genetic history and structure by investigating the distribution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation… 
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