The effect of the duration of progestin use on the occurrence of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women

@article{Archer2001TheEO,
  title={The effect of the duration of progestin use on the occurrence of endometrial cancer in postmenopausal women},
  author={David F Archer},
  journal={Menopause},
  year={2001},
  volume={8},
  pages={245-251}
}
  • D. Archer
  • Published 1 July 2001
  • Medicine
  • Menopause
ObjectiveWomen who have ever used estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), even at a low dose, have an increased incidence of endometrial cancer. The addition of a progestin to ERT reduces the incidence of endometrial cancer. The duration of progestin administration is more important than the dose. DesignA MEDLINE review of the literature was performed using the search terms endometrial cancer, epidemiology, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT). ResultsWomen who have ever used ERT have an increased… 
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