The effect of the Liverpool Care Pathway for the dying: a multi-centre study

@article{Veerbeek2008TheEO,
  title={The effect of the Liverpool Care Pathway for the dying: a multi-centre study},
  author={Laetitia Veerbeek and Lia van Zuylen and Siebe J. Swart and Paul J. van der Maas and Elsbeth de Vogel-Voogt and Carin C.D. van der Rijt and Agnes van der Heide},
  journal={Palliative Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={22},
  pages={145 - 151}
}
We studied the effect of the Liverpool Care Pathway (LCP) on the documentation of care, symptom burden and communication in three health care settings. Between November 2003 and February 2005 (baseline period), the care was provided as usual. Between February 2005 and February 2006 (intervention period), the LCP was used for all patients for whom the dying phase had started. After death of the patient, a nurse and a relative filled in a questionnaire. In the baseline period, 219 nurses and 130… 

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