The effect of queen ants on the survival of Maculinea arion larvae in Myrmica ant nests

@article{Thomas2004TheEO,
  title={The effect of queen ants on the survival of Maculinea arion larvae in Myrmica ant nests},
  author={J. A. Thomas and Judith C. Wardlaw},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={85},
  pages={87-91}
}
SummaryThe mortality of Maculinea arion caterpillars was measured in both laboratory and wild Myrmica nests, and found to be nearly 3 times higher in nests that had queen ants present. This is attributed to ‘queen effect’, which causes worker ants in nests with queens to attack large ant larvae (gynes) that would otherwise develop into new queens. Maculinea arion caterpillars mimic Myrmica larvae, and are usually attacked during the first 10 days after adoption, when they pass through the size… Expand
The capacity of a Myrmica ant nest to support a predacious species of Maculinea butterfly
TLDR
Caterpillars of Maculinea arion have an exceptional ability to withstand starvation, and sometimes survive to parasitize more than one Myrmica colony, and despite these adaptations, predation is an inefficient way to exploit the resources of a MyRMica nest. Expand
Larval niche selection and evening exposure enhance adoption of a predacious social parasite, Maculineaarion (large blue butterfly), by Myrmica ants
TLDR
Larvae of the predatory Maculinea arion increased by >100-fold their probability of being discovered and adopted by Myrmica spp. Expand
Development of parasitic Maculinea teleius (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae) larvae in laboratory nests of four Myrmica ant host species
TLDR
Results indicate that Myrmica species coming from the same site differ in their ability to adopt and rear M. teleius larvae but there was no obvious adaptation of this butterfly species to one of the host ant species. Expand
Chemical disguise as particular caste of host ants in the ant inquiline parasite Niphanda fusca (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)
TLDR
It is suggested that N. fusca caterpillars exploit worker care by matching their cuticular profile to that of the host males, since the males are fed by trophallaxis with workers in their natal nests for approximately ten months. Expand
Looking for the ants: selection of oviposition sites by two myrmecophilous butterfly species
TLDR
It is argued that understanding site selection for oviposition is important for these highly endangered butterfl y species with a specialised life cycle, especially after disturbances or reintroductions. Expand
The ecology of Myrmica ants in relation to the conservation of Maculinea butterflies
TLDR
The latest summary of field data showing the pattern of host specificity by Maculinea is presented, and the current knowledge of habitat partition, colony growth and colony reproduction within communities of Myrmica ants is summarized in relation to the ecology ofMaculinea species. Expand
Multiple host-ant use by the predatory social parasite Phengaris (=Maculinea) arion (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae)
TLDR
Overall low parasitism rates may explain the vulnerability of Phengaris (=Maculinea) arion in Central Europe but further studies are also necessary. Expand
Host Ant Change of a Socially Parasitic Butterfly (Phengaris alcon) through Host Nest Take-Over
TLDR
Testing the possibility of host switch between these two host ant species during larval development of the endangered Alcon blue butterfly suggested higher ecological plasticity in host ant usage of this butterfly than generally thought. Expand
Techniques for studying Maculinea butterflies: I. Rearing Maculinea caterpillars with Myrmica ants in the laboratory
TLDR
Few attempts at rearing highly predacious species of Maculinea to the pupal stage have been successful, but captive rearing can improve survival for conservation and reintroduction programmes and to study and photograph morphological features of individuals under controlled conditions. Expand
Food stress causes differential survival of socially parasitic caterpillars of Maculinea rebeli integrated in colonies of host and non‐host Myrmica ant species
TLDR
Two key phases of host specificity exist in the life of this social parasite: initial integration, in which the caterpillar simply has to be accepted into a host society, followed by full integration, when a relatively high hierarchical status within the host society becomes essential for a caterpillar's survival during periods when the host colony is stressed, e.g., by food shortage. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES
Larvae of Maculinea rebeli, a large-blue butterfly and their Myrmica host ants: patterns of caterpillar growth and survival
TLDR
It is calculated that an average-sized Myrmica schencki colony of 350 workers can produce 4–5 adult butterflies; this laboratory result agrees well with field observations. Expand
Basal hatching by Maculinea butterfly eggs: a consequence of advanced myrmecophily?
TLDR
Maculinea alcon and M. rebeli eggs occur at the highest densities, and need the greatest protection, due to the advanced form of myrmecophily found in these species. Expand
Quantitative aspects of queen control over reproduction in the antMyrmica
Summary1.InMyrmica spp. sexuals are only produced at high worker/queen ratios. This suggests that in large colonies, queen control over worker behaviour is more difficult; experiments are describedExpand
The source of males inMyrmica rubra L. (Hym. Formicidae)
TLDR
The resulting data strongly suggest newly-ecloding workers to be the primary, possibly sole, source of males in Myrmica rubra, and a higher proportion of callow and pale-coloured ants contain ova than do older ants. Expand
Host specificity among Maculinea butterflies in Myrmica ant nests
SummaryEcological studies have been made of all 5 European species of Maculinea. These confirm that M. nausithous and M. rebeli live underground in Myrmica ant nests for 10 months of the year, as hasExpand
Worker population structure and gyne production in the ant Myrmica
TLDR
It is suggested that rapidly growing colonies will have higher proportions of young nurse workers refractory to queens and able to deliver the food necessary for gyne production and could optimise their reproduction in this way. Expand
Larval recognition by workers of the ant Myrmica
TLDR
Workers can distinguish diapause-developed from worker-biased brood in spring, not because of their size, their growth rate, or their queen-potentiality, but because they emit a special signal from the ventral surface. Expand
Queen distribution movements and interactions in a semi-natural Nest of the antmyrmica rubra L.
TLDR
A hierarchy was established between queens where dominat queens were characterised by their infrequent mobility and their seldon aggressive behaviour towards other queens, and subordinate queens were often unsettled and initiated attacks. Expand
5 – Caste Differentiation and Division of Labor
...
1
2
...