The effect of molluscan glue proteins on gel mechanics

@article{Pawlicki2004TheEO,
  title={The effect of molluscan glue proteins on gel mechanics},
  author={Jerzy Pawlicki and Latty Pease and C. M. Pierce and Thomas Startz and Yongfang Zhang and A. M. Smith},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={207},
  pages={1127 - 1135}
}
SUMMARY Several molluscs have been shown to alternate between a non-adhesive trail mucus and a similar gel that forms a strong glue. The major structural difference between the two secretions is the presence of specific proteins in the adhesive mucus. The present study identifies similar proteins from the glue of the slug Arion subfuscus and the land snail Helix aspersa. To investigate the role played by these proteins in adhesion, the proteins were isolated from the adhesive mucus of different… Expand
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