The effect of gun control laws on hospital admissions for children in the United States

@article{Tashiro2016TheEO,
  title={The effect of gun control laws on hospital admissions for children in the United States},
  author={Jun Tashiro and Rebecca S Lane and Lawrence W. Blass and Eduardo Alema{\~n}y P{\'e}rez and Juan E. Sola},
  journal={Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery},
  year={2016},
  volume={81},
  pages={S54–S60}
}
BACKGROUND Gun control laws vary greatly between states within the United States. We hypothesized that states with strict gun laws have lower mortality and resource utilization rates from pediatric firearms-related injury admissions. METHODS Kids’ Inpatient Database (1997–2012) was searched for accidental (E922), self-inflicted (E955), assault (E965), legal intervention-related (E970), or undetermined circumstance (E985) firearm injuries. Patients were younger than 20 years and admitted for… Expand
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