The effect of emotional freedom techniques on stress biochemistry: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract

This study examined the changes in cortisol levels and psychological distress symptoms of 83 nonclinical subjects receiving a single hour long intervention. Subjects were randomly assigned to either an emotional freedom technique (EFT) group, a psychotherapy group receiving a supportive interviews (SI), or a no treatment (NT) group. Salivary cortisol assays were performed immediately before and 30 minutes after the intervention. Psychological distress symptoms were assessed using the symptom assessment-45. The EFT group showed statistically significant improvements in anxiety (-58.34%, p < 0.05), depression (-49.33%, p < 0.002), the overall severity of symptoms (-50.5%, p < 0.001), and symptom breadth (-41.93%, p < 0.001). The EFT group experienced a significant decrease in cortisol level (-24.39%; SE, 2.62) compared with the decrease observed in the SI (-14.25%; SE, 2.61) and NT (-14.44%; SE, 2.67) groups (p < 0.03). The decrease in cortisol levels in the EFT group mirrored the observed improvement in psychological distress.

DOI: 10.1097/NMD.0b013e31826b9fc1

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@article{Church2012TheEO, title={The effect of emotional freedom techniques on stress biochemistry: a randomized controlled trial.}, author={Dawson Church and Garret L. Yount and Audrey J. Brooks}, journal={The Journal of nervous and mental disease}, year={2012}, volume={200 10}, pages={891-6} }