The effect of close proximity holographic wristbands on human balance and limits of stability: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of holographic technology wristbands on human balance and stability performance. Forty-two individuals volunteered to participate in the study. A performance technology silicone wristband containing two holograms was utilised as the 'Device'. A 'placebo' performance technology silicone wristband was utilised where the two holograms were removed and replaced with two stainless steel discs to the same dimensions and weight as the Device. Each participant was randomly allocated into two different testing protocol groups: Protocol 1 (Device-baseline-placebo) and Protocol 2 (placebo-baseline-Device). One week following the initial testing, the Protocol 1 group was tested under the conditions of Protocol 2, and vice versa, so that all participants were taken through both protocols. Results indicated that there was no statistically significant mean change in balance performance brought about by either the placebo or the Device. Notably, the sample data indicated an overall decrease in balance and stability. However, these mean changes are still within the bounds of what would be expected assuming the Device had no overall effect. The findings of this study indicate that holographic technology wristbands have no effect on human balance and stability performance.

DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2011.01.020

Cite this paper

@article{Brice2011TheEO, title={The effect of close proximity holographic wristbands on human balance and limits of stability: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.}, author={Simon R Brice and Brett S Jarosz and Rick A Ames and James Baglin and Cliff da Costa}, journal={Journal of bodywork and movement therapies}, year={2011}, volume={15 3}, pages={298-303} }