The economy and environment of the 4th and 3rd millennia BC in the northern Alpine foreland based on studies of animal bones

@article{Schibler2006TheEA,
  title={The economy and environment of the 4th and 3rd millennia BC in the northern Alpine foreland based on studies of animal bones},
  author={J{\"o}rg Schibler},
  journal={Environmental Archaeology},
  year={2006},
  volume={11},
  pages={49 - 64}
}
  • J. Schibler
  • Published 1 April 2006
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Environmental Archaeology
Abstract The economic and environmental data presented here are based on identifications of more than 275000 animal bones from 126 Neolithic lake shore settlements dated to between 4300 cal. BC and 2500 cal. BC. Due to the excellent state of preservation of all organic material and the consequent precise dating, mostly by dendrochronology, only results from lake shore sites in the Swiss alpine foreland and the area of the Bodensee (Lake Constance) have been considered. Marked fluctuations in… 

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