The economic value of informal caregiving.

@article{Arno1999TheEV,
  title={The economic value of informal caregiving.},
  author={Peter S. Arno and Carol Levine and Margaret M. Memmott},
  journal={Health affairs},
  year={1999},
  volume={18 2},
  pages={
          182-8
        }
}
This study explores the current market value of the care provided by unpaid family members and friends to ill and disabled adults. Using large, national data sets we estimate that the national economic value of informal caregiving was $196 billion in 1997. This figure dwarfs national spending for formal home health care ($32 billion) and nursing home care ($83 billion). Estimates for five states also are presented. This study broadens the issue of informal caregiving from the micro level, where… 
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This chapter uses data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to describe how informal care provided by adult children and spousal caregivers interact with economic stress. Multiple economic
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Family caregivers represent a key informal support mechanism, with cost estimates of their value varying by the type of person cared for, disease state, or whether care is national or local. This
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The economic value of informal caregiving is compared to other benchmarks in order to underscore the magnitude of these unpaid contributions, estimates of productivity losses to U.S. businesses from caregiving are presented, and the critical role that family caregivers play in the nation's long-term care system is highlighted.
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Estimates derived from national data reveal that the economic value of informal caregiving for ailing adults was $196 billion in 1997-dwarfing the $32 billion spent for home health care and $83
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The findings suggest that it is time to explore alternative or complements to informal caregiving, and the need to find more equitable ways to share caregiving costs and risk, and provide support to assist those who currently provide care.
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A telephone survey with 339 randomly selected Chinese Canadian caregivers examined the employment and economic costs of family caregiving for the elderly. Although the Chinese culture places a strong
The opportunity costs of informal elder-care in the United States: new estimates from the American Time Use Survey.
TLDR
Informal caregiving remains a significant phenomenon in the United States with a high opportunity cost, although it remains more economical (in the aggregate) than skilled paid care.
The economic value of long-term family caregiving. The situation of caregivers of persons with spinal cord injury in Switzerland.
TLDR
The economic value of long-term family caregivers and how these costs would be shared by the health system, the social insurances and the cared-for person in the absence of informal caregivers is estimated.
Does Formal Employment Reduce Informal Caregiving?
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Using the Survey of Income and Program Participation, this work finds that, among women of prime caregiving ages (40-64 years), working 10% more hours per week reduces the probability of providing informal care by about 2 percentage points.
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